Mail Order Plants Arrived!

Getting boxes filled with plants in the mail feels a little like Christmas. Santa must have come early this year as a few gift boxes made their way to our house recently.

 As some of you may know, Mountain Crest Gardens has recently started selling plug size agave. At the time of my order they had a relatively small selection but what a genius idea - right? Maybe if we buy enough they'll expand their selection of these bite size plants. I've ordered from Mountain Crest in the past and they've always impressed me with the quality of their plants and the first rate packing.


I couldn't resist opening a few of the packages straight away



I ended up ordering several of the varieties they had for sale: A. filifera, A. montana, A. utahensis, and A. striata ssp stricta. There were a few others I would have ordered but they were 'not quite' ready for sale. Truth be told I ordered 17 plants in total (luckily I had a 15% discount coupon).

How long does it take to wrap each plant?
I'll pot most of these up in one gallon containers and wait for them to get a bit larger before they find a home in my front yard.


A few weeks back I also received another box of plants from the Institute for Aloe Studies. This was my second order; my first order arrived in the summer. I really like that the IAS offers so many Aloes outside the mainstream of those available in nurseries. Sadly I miscalculated how much late afternoon sun they'd receive on their first day outside and as a result some of the plants below suffered a sun burn. I'm still kicking myself.

From left: Aloe mudenensis, Aloe rivierei

From top left: Aloe glauca, Aloe scobinifolia, Aloe secundiflora


From left: Aloe harlana, Aloe gerstneri, Aloe khamiesensis
 As you can see the vast majority of these plants have root systems already so I may end up putting a few straight into the ground. 

I'll be sure to post progress updates in the spring!

July, 2019 Update

All the Agaves and Aloes were upgraded to one gallon pots. The Aloe glauca was planted in my front yard.

Agave montana

Agave striata - the fastest grower

Agave schidigera

Agave utahensis - the slowest grower

Agave filifera

Aloe mudenensis
Aloe mudenensis






Aloe rivierei
Aloe rivierei - robust, quicker growing
Aloe scobinifolia
Aloe scobinifolia - slow grower
Aloe secundiflora
Aloe secundiflora
A. secundiflora has been particularly sensitive to sun burn.

Aloe harlana
Aloe gerstneri
Aloe gerstneri
Aloe khamiesensis
Aloe khamiesensis

Updates:


Agave filifera (Nov 10th, 2019)

Agave schidigera (Nov 10th, 2019)

Comments

  1. "bite size" Agaves, omg...you made me spit my coffee! Thanks for the tip though, I'm off to check out their website...

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  2. What a haul! FYI, The Huntington has an International Succulent Introductions (ISI) division that takes plant orders between March and October. I ordered from them a couple of years ago and was impressed by the selection, the prices and the packaging. Here's a link to the 2018 catalog if you're interested: http://www.huntington.org/botanicaldiv/isi/ISI2018/catalogindex.html

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the tip Kris. Sounds promising - I will take a look and I'm sure find lots to order.

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